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Regional Differences and Race Effects in Mental Health Symptoms Among Juvenile Offenders

Fri, 11/28/2014 - 2:58pm

Regional differences in the reporting of mental health symptoms among juvenile justice (JJ) involved youth were examined using data from the 70,423 youths in the MAYSI-2 national norm study (Vincent et al., 2008). The percentage of youth scoring above Caution on MAYSI-2 scales was examined by race/ethnicity (white vs. minorities) and sex. Regional differences were assessed using Cochran’s Mantel-Haenszel (CMH) analyses. White youth were more likely to score above caution on all clinical scales except Depressed-Anxious. An interesting gender and race/ethnicity effect emerged such that White male youth in the Northeast and Midwest were more likely than Minority youth to score above caution; whereas White female youth in the West were more likely than Minority youth to score above caution.

Impact of MAYSI-2 Mental Health Screening in Juvenile Detention

Fri, 11/28/2014 - 2:58pm

This poster reports on factors that influenced the rapid adoption and implementation of the Massachusetts Youth Screening Instrument-version 2 (MAYSI-2) and the perceived consequences of routine MAYSI-2 mental health screening. Semi-structured interviews and focus groups were conducted with administrators, managers, and front-line staff in juvenile detention centers in three states (n=19). Results will allow us to better inform juvenile justice facilities regarding the conditions under which screening can more often result in increases in mental health services to youth entering the system and help guide future efforts to provide technology to juvenile justice programs in the interest of youths.

Gender and Race Differences in Juvenile Mental Health Symptoms: MAYSI-2 National Norm Study

Fri, 11/28/2014 - 2:58pm

Presents a study regarding gender and race differences in juvenile mental health symptoms, using the MAYSI-2 National Norm Study.

Trajectories of Offending from Childhood to Early Adulthood in Girls With and Without Mental Health System Involvement

Fri, 11/28/2014 - 2:58pm

Criminology literature is overwhelmingly based in studies of males, though studies of gender differences or of females are rapidly accumulating. Rates of psychiatric disorder are typically higher in females involved with justice systems compared to males. However, the juvenile or criminal justice involvement of girls in mental health systems, or with serious mental health conditions is greatly understudied. Identifying their arrest risk onset, peak, and offset provides practitioners information about when to intervene and with whom. The goal of the present study is to describe within-individual longitudinal arrest patterns from ages 8-24 in this population, and determine whether their arrest patterns differ from general offender females in ways that have practice implications.

Methods: Using statewide administrative data from the Massachusetts Department of Mental Health (DMH) and Massachusetts’ juvenile and criminal courts, a database was constructed that contained juvenile and criminal arrest histories to age 25 for females born 1976-79. DMH females were adolescent service users (n=738), Non-DMH females had no DMH database records (n=34,436). Massachusetts Census 2000 provided the size of the general female population. Developmental trajectory modeling was used to group individuals’ patterns of offending over time (trajectories) into “clusters” of those whose trajectories are similar, and describe trajectories. Trajectory comparison methods minimized the greater Non-DMH cohort size.

Results: DMH females were far more likely to be arrested by age 25 than Non-DMH females (46% vs. 22%) and to be arrested at multiple ages (28% vs. 7%). Analyses revealed eight justice system trajectories among those with multiple ages of arrest. Trajectories varied on level of involvement and timing of onset/offset/peaks. Non-DMH females comprised at least 93% of each trajectory cluster, though several clusters showed significant over- or under-representation of DMH females.

Conclusions: Concern about justice system involvement of female youths in intensive MH services is justified. Among girls with multiple ages with arrest, differences in criminal careers between the mental health and non mental health system users was minimal. Implications of trajectory findings for timing and type of intervention will be presented.

Knowledge Exchange as Program Evaluation: The Family Networks Implementation Study as a Case Example

Fri, 11/28/2014 - 2:58pm

The Family Networks is a comprehensive system transformation initiative to redesign and integrate traditional categorical services across the Commonwealth into local service systems for children, youth, and families served by the child welfare system. The Family Networks Implementation Study (FNIS), a partnership between MA/DCF and UMMS, is a study of the process of implementing systems change, and provides a case example of knowledge exchange

Supporting Clubhouse Members in their Role as Parents

Fri, 11/28/2014 - 2:58pm

Clubhouses, built on the principles of recovery and psychiatric rehabilitation, have nottraditionally identified and responded to the parenting related goals of club members.This poster presents findings for the conditions necessary to support Clubhouse members in their roles as parents.

The Family Options Project: Implementing an Innovative Intervention for Parents with Mental Illnesses and Their Families

Fri, 11/28/2014 - 2:58pm

The Family Options Project reflects a productive partnership between researchers and providers at the UMMS Center for Mental Health Services Research and Employment Options, Inc., Marlborough, MA The Family Options Intervention is an evidence-informed psychiatric rehabilitation intervention, developed and tested within the context of a community-based agency setting.

Patterns of Psychotherapy Attendance in Emerging and Mature Adults

Fri, 11/28/2014 - 2:58pm

Approximately 760,000 emerging adults use outpatient psychotherapy in the U.S. each year (Olfson et al.2002). Emerging adults are 1.6-7.9 times more likely to drop out of mental health treatment than Fully mature adults (Edlund et.al., 2002; Olfson Et al., 2002).This Study compared temporal patterns of attendance and non attendance between emerging and mature adults.

Treatment Retention Intervention for Emerging Adults in Outpatient Psychotherapy

Fri, 11/28/2014 - 2:58pm

We developed Motivational Enhancement Therapy (MET) treatment for emerging adults.

The Learning and Working During the Transition to Adulthood Rehabilitation Research and Training Center

Fri, 11/28/2014 - 2:58pm

Research and dissemination activities are singularly focused on developing knowledge for and about developmentally appropriate services that help transition Age Youth and Young Adults (TAYYA) with Serious Mental Health Conditions (SMHC) successfully complete their schooling and training and launch their adult working careers.

Do Adult MH Services Need to be Developmentally Appropriate?

Fri, 11/28/2014 - 2:58pm

State level adult mental health administrators express little belief in needing developmentally appropriate services for young adults, and few such programs exist across the country.

Examining Latino Differences in Mental Healthcare Use: The Roles of Acculturation and Attitudes Towards Healthcare

Fri, 11/28/2014 - 2:58pm

We investigate the relative contribution of self-reliant attitudes and culturally specific factors in mental healthcare services for Latinos of Mexican, Cuban and Puerto Rican origin.

Lifetime Alcohol Abuse Prevalence: Role of Childhood and Adult Religion

Fri, 11/28/2014 - 2:58pm

Findings presented regarding childhood and adult religiosity/spirituality as protective factors against Lifetime Alcohol Abuse.

Multicultural Academic Interest Group: Promoting Multicultural Research, Education & Services

Fri, 11/28/2014 - 2:58pm

Eliminating racial/ethnic disparities in access and quality of mental care has emerged as a national priority as highlighted in the 2001 Surgeon General’s report, the President’s New Freedom Commission on Mental Health, and Healthy People 2000 and 2010. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) ranks this issue third among its top five priorities.

MISSION Diversion & Recovery for Traumatized Veterans (MISSION DIRECT VET): Early Findings and Lessons Learned

Fri, 11/28/2014 - 2:58pm

MISSION DIRECT VET is a SAMHSA- funded, court based diversion program targeting veterans in Massachusetts with trauma-related mental health and substance use problems. MISSION-DIRECT VET seeks to: Reduce criminal justice involvement Treat mental health, substance abuse and other trauma related symptoms Use a systematic wrap-around model Provide care coordination, peer support and trauma informed services Develop interagency partnerships to serve veterans with co-occurring disorders

MISSION Diversion & Recovery for Traumatized Veterans (MISSION DIRECT VET): Early Planning and Development

Fri, 11/28/2014 - 2:58pm

MISSION DIRECT VET is a SAMHSA- funded, court based diversion program targeting veterans in Massachusetts with trauma-related mental health and substance use problems. MISSION-DIRECT VET seeks to: Reduce criminal justice involvement Treat mental health, substance abuse and other trauma related symptoms Use a systematic wrap-around model Provide care coordination, peer support and trauma informed service.

The Mental Health Agency Research Network (MHARN): Developing a statewide network for knowledge sharing, technical assistance & collaborative research

Fri, 11/28/2014 - 2:58pm

The Mental Health Agency Research Network (MHARN) is a developing network for sharing knowledge and research collaboration between the UMMS Dept. of Psychiatry and other academics, DMH personnel, community providers, consumers and family members. Its mission is to close the gap between science and service in mental health services in Massachusetts by improving implementation of evidence based practices to benefit consumers. The MHARN provides a structure and mechanism for the Center for Mental Health Services Research (CMHSR) to better engage with DMH staff and community agencies around the state. As experience and research on science-to-service has demonstrated that dissemination of information about research findings is not sufficient to bring about changes in practice and benefits to consumers, the MHARN will incorporate principles and practices of the emerging science of implementation research.

Development of a Self-report Measure of Dual Diagnosis Capability for Addiction and Mental Health Programs

Fri, 11/28/2014 - 2:58pm

The purpose of this study is to develop and test the psychometrics of a self-report version of a measure of the capacity of addiction and mental health programs to deliver dual-diagnosis treatment, that is, to provide treatment for both addiction problems and mental health problems. Traditionally these services are provided by very different service providers that did not until recently interact very well, if at all. The increasing recognition that patients who suffer from both kinds of problems – who are dually diagnosed – would benefit from integrated delivery of addiction and mental health services has led to efforts to encourage provision of such integrated services in programs that have tended to focus primarily on the delivery of either addiction or mental health services to the exclusion of the other. In order to assess how well the integration of these services is progressing, various measures have been developed, one of which is the original Dual Diagnosis Capability in Addiction Treatment (DDCAT) Index. The DDCAT, as it now stands, however, is a very time-intensive tool. It requires a rater to visit a site and spend one half to a full day there interviewing administrators, therapists, and patients, reviewing medical records, and attending meetings. The purpose of this study is to test a self-report version of the DDCAT that will be administered to administrators and therapists to see how well it performs compared to the more time- intensive procedures of the original DDCAT.

Integration of the ATTOC 12-Steps into the UMass Tobacco-Free Initiative

Fri, 11/28/2014 - 2:58pm

On May 27, 2008, UMass Memorial Health Care and The University of Massachusetts Medical School implemented a complete tobacco- free policy, both indoors and outdoors-- for all properties, including parking facilities and in vehicles parked there. This ban is for all tobacco products, including chewing tobacco, and extends to everyone who smokes--patients, visitors, employees, students and vendors.

Co-occurring Mental & Physical Disorders Among Adults Under 65 Years of Age

Fri, 11/28/2014 - 2:58pm

Research in the areas of co-occurring depression, heart disease, diabetes, asthma and schizophrenia are extensive. However, a comprehensive account of physical illnesses among those with many types of mental illnesses is scarce. To estimate the prevalence of common chronic physical illnesses among a nationally representative sample of adults under 65 years of age with mental illness and examine the demographic, socioeconomic, and health status predictors of co-occurring physical and mental illness.